From One Historian of Egypt to Another: Political Comment and Teleology

18 Apr

In response to Khaled Fahmy’s latest post. (Dr. Fahmy is a historian at the American University in Cairo in the Department of History)

As a a scholar of nineteenth century history, you may term yourself a scholar of ‘modern’ Egypt in the academic sense (in academia, contemporary historians cover the present and recent past, modern historians of Egypt usually cover the period from Napoleon’s invasion to the turn of the century, or beyond) but why — other than demonstrating your command over your own period of expertise — do you believe that institution-building of the nineteenth century is a blueprint for what transpired during and after January 25, 2011? And why insist so specifically that Egypt’s military have NOT saved the country from the sort of bloodletting that Syria’s military engaged in (that is certainly the bottom line)? A contemporary historian would be compelled to admit that the human toll (deaths, torture, imprisonment, death by starvation, refugee numbers) resulting from Syria’s revolution is immensely higher than in Egypt, in absolute numbers and proportionally.

You wrote:

السيسي ومستشاريه مقتنعين فعلا بكده، ومعاهم قطاع كبير من الإعلاميين ال نجحوا في تصوير ٢٥ يناير على إنها مؤامرة من ناس مأجورة بايعة البلد ومش هاممها لو مصر بقت زي سوريا.

لكن الحقيقة غير كده.
Not only do you insist on this point, but you claim it is Field Marshall al-Sisi and his advisors who came to this conclusion, whereas in fact, this idea is asserted by vast numbers of people who would have preferred a civilian candidate if there were a viable one as well as individuals who haven’t yet decided who to support.

You return to Mohammad Ali Pasha’s period to speak of Egypt’s achievements in vaccinating against smallpox and teaching medicine. Then you rightly condemn the current disastrous situation in health care given the epidemics of hepatitis and bilharzia. I too studied with a biographer of Mohammad Ali Pasha, Afaf Lutfi al-Sayyid (Marsot). However, her use of these examples of early state development was usually to point out how Great Britain had de-industrialized and discouraged Egypt’s growth and development. Even that is besides the point at present.

While miracles are needed today, in both the sphere of public health, and reform of the judiciary (as you also point out), I don’t see why we must infer that the transitional government, or the one to be elected will necessarily be any worse than the Mubarak government which brought public health, the judiciary, and if I might add, the security sector and public education to their current sorry states, and which led to the violations of human rights alluded to here along with castigation of the military for retaining control over its own budget:

ولما كنا بنهتف ضد العسكر وبنقول “يسقط يسقط حكم العسكر” ما كناش بننادي بتسريح الجيش ولا بهزيمته. إنما كنا بنطالب بحقنا في إننا نتدرب بجد لما نتجند، وإن تجنيدنا ما يبقاش لحساب الهانم مرات البيه الضابط، وإن الجيش دوره ينحصر في الدفاع عن الحدود وما لوش دعوة بمحطات البنزين ولا بصوابع الكفتة، وإن ميزانية الجيش تبقى خاضعة لرقابة المجلس التشريعي علشان الناس تبقى عارفة فلوسها رايحة فين، وإن ضباط الجيش يعرفوا إن دي أموال البلد مش عرق الجيش، وإن ما فيش أي حد يحق له إنه يعذب المواطنين المصريين في المتحف المصري أو أي متحف تاني، ولا يكشف على عذرية البنات المصريات ال نزلوا يطالبوا بحقهم في حياة كريمة، ومؤسسات تخدمهم، وبلد محترم يحترمهم.

People might assume from the above that the military still conduct virginity tests, (they were partially outlawed. http://www.cnn.com/2011/12/27/world/meast/egypt-virginity-tests/) and while it is a shame that Samira Ibrahim’s case against the military failed, is that surprising in the context of disastrous treatment of detainees and prisoners for the last decades? How am I to understand the fact that you single out the military in the latter part of your essay, suggesting that they are ill-prepared to undertake any of the nation’s needed reforms and not the security forces of the Ministry of Interior for what you write is your inability to “be safe in our homes”?

Somehow the impression is given that Egypt is about to elect a military government, and not a civilian government. Why would a ‘modern historian’ choose to give such an impression?

Let’s return to this inaccurate insistence that Egyptian history runs in a unidimensional pattern. The military is not an individual. That numerous motivations may be at work in an organization, is a given. But this is no secret. There is no need to go on insisting that the praetorianism of the Egyptian state is as it was in the 19th century, or the 1950s and ’60s. And there are many aspects on which you are silent — for instance, the U.S. role in promoting the Muslim Brotherhood into seizing its political opportunity post-Feb. 11, 2011. It is likewise popular in many circles to discuss self-serving aspects of the military’s decision, exaggerating their stability and economic holdings.

From all this we don’t gain any new understanding of the two revolutions of 1/25/11 and 6/30/13, mostly because you discounted the phenomena of civilians acting en masse and populism.

In the years I lived and taught in Egypt, I heard many quasi-scholarly discussions begin by asking “Why don’t Egyptians rebel?” and involving grotesque Orientalist assessments of the Egyptian character. I answered by looking at the various theories of revolution we had developed up to that time from Marx to Ted Gurr’s argument in _Why Do Men Rebel_, and concluded that eventually Egyptians would rebel, as they did. This supposed passivity should no longer be part of the currently pressing question of “what did Egyptians gain/what will they gain from the revolution?” Neither should we remain mired in an externally-defined and teleological question, “why do Egyptians assent to the military”? While certain Western journalists obsessively resort to this trope, just as they or their editors love to include the word ‘Pharoah’ in their article titles, you, as a scholar must certainly must be able to discern that it is ahistorical to project consistency from one era (or decade, or period of a few years) onto another. And it is far too soon to conclude “the revolution has failed” or that the military will always dominate.

Here are Khaled Fahmy’s comments in full:
يمكن فعلا الواحد لازم يشرح بديهيات الأشياء.

إحنا فعلا رددنا هتاف “الشعب يريد إسقاط النظام”، وقولنا بعلو صوتنا “يسقط يسقط حكم العسكر”، وطالبنا بقوة ووضوح بضرورة إعادة هيكلة الداخلية. بس هل ده كان يعني إننا كنا عاوزين إننا نسقط الدولة ونجيبها الأرض؟ هل كنا عاوزين فعلا إن جيشنا ينهار؟ هل كنا بنطالب بتحطيم جهاز الأمن وإن البلد تبقى مفتوحة سداح مداح؟

السيسي ومستشاريه مقتنعين فعلا بكده، ومعاهم قطاع كبير من الإعلاميين ال نجحوا في تصوير ٢٥ يناير على إنها مؤامرة من ناس مأجورة بايعة البلد ومش هاممها لو مصر بقت زي سوريا.

لكن الحقيقة غير كده.

أنا ما أقدرش اتكلم عن غيري وأدعي إني عارف كل واحد نزل وهتف ليه ضد النظام والداخلية والجيش. ممكن أتكلم بس عن نفسي.

أنا دارس لتاريخ مصر الحديث، وشايف إنه تاريخ مشرف وجميل. شايف إن إحنا كشعب وكبلد عرفنا نحقق حاجات كثيرة، وبنينا دولة حديثة بمؤسسات حديثة. أنا بأدرس تاريخ المؤسسات دي، تحديدا: الجيش والقضاء والشرطة والمستشفيات (وبشكل أقل الصحافة والنقابات والجامعات). المؤسسات دي هي ال أعطت لمصر الريادة في المنطقة. ريادة مصر على جيرانها مش نتيجة السبعة آلاف سنة والأهرامات ومينا موحد القطرين والكلام ال بيرددوه في الإعلام والمدارس.

الريادة في العصر الحديث سببها إننا بدأنا في بناء مؤسسات الدولة الحديثة قبل جيراننا بماية أو ماية وخمسين سنة على الأقل.

لكن المشكلة إن المؤسسات دي فيها خلل جوهري: المؤسسات دي بتخدم نفسها مش بتخدمنا إحنا كمواطنين.

يعني مثلا: الداخلية مش بتحميني كمواطن لكنها بتمتهن كرامتي وبتعذبني في الأقسام والسجون. ونتيجة لإن ضباطها عارفين إنه لا رقيب عليهم فده خلاهم يهتموا بمصالحهم، ويتراخوا في الارتفاع بمستوى مهنتهم، ونتيجة ده كان تدهور مهارتهم في التحقيقات الجنائية، والنتيجة المنطقية لكل ده هو شعوري أنا كمواطن بعدم الأمان في بيتي.

القضاء نفس الحاجة. أنا دارس تاريخ القضاء المصري الحديث وطالع لي كتاب عن الموضوع ده كمان ثلاثة شهور. القضاء ده كان فعلا شامخ. بالميم فعلا وبجد مش تريقة. إنما ده كان من ماية سنة. النهارده القضاء ترهل وتراخي وتدهور. ما فيش فكر جديد، ولا عدالة ناجزة، ولا رقابة على القضاة. المحاكم منهارة، والعدالة بطيئة، والأحكام جائرة، والناس حقوقها ضايعة.

المؤسسات الصحية نفس الحاجة. أنا برضو دارس تاريخ المؤسسة دي. تاريخ ناصع، مشرف، يخلى الواحد فعلا يفتخر بيه. مصر كانت أول بلد في المنطقة تقوم بحملة ناجحة للتطعيم ضد الجدري، وكانت أول بلد في المنطقة تنجح في القيام بإحصاء عام ودقيق للسكان (سنة ١٨٤٨)، وكانت أول بلد في المنطقة تفتح مدارس طبية (القصر العيني) تدرّس الطب بناء على تشريح الجثث (مش كتب الأقدمين). والنتيجة: القضاء على الأوبئة من كوليرا لطاعون، إنخفاض معدلات الوفيات بين الأطفال، ارتفاع متوسط سن الوفاة، وتحسن ملحوظ في الصحة العامة. إنما ده كان برضه من ماية سنة. ده الوقت مستشفياتنا مرتع للمرض، شهادات الطب بتاعتنا مش معترف بيها في العالم، ومنظومة الصحة العامة منهارة، المرض بيفتك بصحة الناس: أغنياءهم وفقراءهم، والدولة بإهمالها هي ال بتتسبب أحيانا في نشر الأمراض والأوبئة، وخير مثال على ذلك مرض الكبد الوبائي ال كان من أهم أسباب انتشاره هذا الانتشار الرهيب استخدام إبر غير معقمة في مستوصفات وعيادات حكومية في الثمانينات في إطار الحملة القومية وقتها للقضاء على البلهارزيا.

أما الجيش فحدث ولا حرج. الجيش المصري كانت له صولات وجولات، غزى السودان والجزيرة العربية وكريت واليونان والشام وجنوب الأناضول، وحقق انتصارات مدوية. لكن ده برضه من أكثر من ماية سنة. جيشنا الحديث سجله سجل هزائم وانكسارات. وأي هزائم وانكسارات!! ١٩٦٧. أنا ما عنديش أدنى شك إن من أهم الأسباب (ومش كلها علشان ما حدش يقول لي طب وأمريكا وموازين القوى والصهيونية) ال ورا هذا السجل الشائن للجيش المصري الحديث هو غياب الرقابة الشعبية عليه. أنا مش قصدي إن تبقى فيه مناقشة عامة للخطط العسكرية، إنما قصدي إن الشعب، بمجلسه التشريعي، وصحافته، ورأيه العام، ومجلس وزراؤه يبقى له دور رقابي على أداء الجيش. يعني أنا كمواطن مصري اتجندت وخدمت في الجيش (سنة 1986) عندي شكوك حقيقية في الجاهزية القتالية للجيش، لإني بصراحة ما شفتش أي علامة جوه الجيش لقوة قتالية محترفة. كل ال شفتهم ضباط ورتب وفلوس ما لهاش آخر، لكن كل ده مالوش علاقة بالحرب، ولا بالتدريب، ولا بالمناورات ولا بالتحضير لأي قتال من أي نوع، اللهم إلا إذلال المجندين ومسح كرامتهم. وبعد إنهاء خدمتي كل ال شفته من الجيش طرق وكباري ومطاعم وشركات ونوادي ومحطات بنزين “وطنية” وناس بتهلل وتقول تسلم الأيادي. طب والتدريب؟ والتسليح؟ والعقيدة الجهادية بتاعت المؤسسة دي؟ دي أسئلة مش مسموح لينا إننا نقرب منها، مع إنها أسئلة مهمة ومحورية وتخص أمن وسلامة المواطن خاصة إننا عايشين في منطقة من أخطر وأدمى مناطق العالم.

ده تحليلي أنا. أنا لما نزلت يوم ٢٥ يناير والأيام والأسابيع والشهور التالية كنت بأنزل مش علشان عاوز أجيب الدولة دي الأرض. بالعكس. أنا نزلت مع أصحابي وزمايلي ال أظن كانوا بيشاركوني حسرتي على البلد علشان ما كانش هاين علينا التدهور ال شايفينه حوالينا والخراب ال أصاب مؤسسات البلد.

إحنا لما كنا بنهتف بإسقاط النظام ما كناش عاوزين نسقط البلد، إنما كنا عاوزين نسقط النظام الّ خرّب البلد.

لما كنا بننادي بضرورة إصلاح القضاء كنا بنطالب بتحقيق العدالة وبإنهاء الفساد ال بيرتع في صفوف القضاة، وإن المواطن يبقى من حقه الحصول على حقوقه المغتصبة بسرعة وكفاءة ويسر.

لما كنا بننادي بضرورة إعادة هيكلة الداخلية كنا بنؤكد على حقنا في الشعور بالأمن في بيوتنا، وفي نفس الوقت بحقنا في إننا منتعذبش في الأقسام ولا إننا نتهان على إيد أي ضابط شرطة معدّي في الشارع.

ولما كنا بنهتف ضد العسكر وبنقول “يسقط يسقط حكم العسكر” ما كناش بننادي بتسريح الجيش ولا بهزيمته. إنما كنا بنطالب بحقنا في إننا نتدرب بجد لما نتجند، وإن تجنيدنا ما يبقاش لحساب الهانم مرات البيه الضابط، وإن الجيش دوره ينحصر في الدفاع عن الحدود وما لوش دعوة بمحطات البنزين ولا بصوابع الكفتة، وإن ميزانية الجيش تبقى خاضعة لرقابة المجلس التشريعي علشان الناس تبقى عارفة فلوسها رايحة فين، وإن ضباط الجيش يعرفوا إن دي أموال البلد مش عرق الجيش، وإن ما فيش أي حد يحق له إنه يعذب المواطنين المصريين في المتحف المصري أو أي متحف تاني، ولا يكشف على عذرية البنات المصريات ال نزلوا يطالبوا بحقهم في حياة كريمة، ومؤسسات تخدمهم، وبلد محترم يحترمهم.

2 Responses to “From One Historian of Egypt to Another: Political Comment and Teleology”

  1. OScube April 18, 2014 at 4:15 pm #

    Reblogged this on Frustrations And Disappointments .

    • sherifazuhur April 20, 2014 at 9:28 pm #

      “frustrations and disappointments” sounds apt! Thank you

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: